Termites Aren’t Alone – Other Insects Threaten Your Home, Your Outbuil…

Termites Aren’t Alone – Other Insects Threaten Your Home, Your Outbuil…




Don’t get fixated on termites when you find holes in your wood. They’re a major threat, yes, but not the only insects that cause damage to building structures. You likely hear more about termites, because they’re the insects that pest control companies like to advertise as the super bad guy when structural damage occurs.
 
More about termites in a moment, but first let’s talk about the other wood-destroying bugs that we often experience.
 
Ever noticed tiny holes in your wooden furniture? Those holes are the first warning that your furniture is disappearing. I’ve noticed this condition more in the legs of chairs, close to the floor. This damage typically indicates a wood-boring beetle of some sort, and if you don’t catch it early, you’ll say goodbye to the furniture they infest.
 
Sometimes after picking yourself off the floor when the leg collapses.
 
These guys are tiny, black, and difficult to see.
 
Here’s another one. I find new presence of this one in my barn every one or two years. The first hint it’s there is a round hole sized about halfway between a nickel, and a quarter.
 
This is the Carpenter Bee. It looks like a Bumblebee, though the yellow band isn’t as bright in color. The male doesn’t sting; the female can, though it rarely does. They chew into the unfinished wood (if it’s painted they can’t bite into it easily), usually from the bottom of the board, tunnel vertically about an inch, and then turn horizontally for a distance. After tunneling along the board a while, they lay their eggs as they back out, enclosing the eggs with walls they build from the loose wood dust they chewed away.
 
They don’t eat the wood, but their tunneling does weaken the building structure.
 
Then there’s the Carpenter Ant. They’re easy to identify because they’re big black ants. They bore into trees most of the time, but do move into nearby structures as they travel outward from their “base colony,” creating satellite colonies. They don’t eat the wood either; they discard the dust as they tunnel into the tree or building making their abodes.
 
nevertheless, they kill the tree, and destroy any structure they bore into.
 
Back to the termite, probably the hardest wood-damaging insect to locate. That’s because they move into from underground, start at the foundation of your home, and eat their way upward inside the walls. You’ll want to study identification techniques to find where they leave clues of their presence.
 
Knowing what the termite looks like brings another learning curve your way. They’re brownish in color, but look very much like an ant. The quickest way to tell one from the other is understanding that ants have pinched waists. Think of the hourglass shape. The ant body resembles that curving configuration. The termite body has no waist, no curves.
 
The first step to controlling wood-damaging insects is the identification course of action. An organized inspection of buildings, and trees, performed on a regular schedule, alerts you of pest trouble. Make sure you include the foundation of your home. Get into the crawl space and look close. Learn how to recognize the presence of each different bug.
Once you know what’s there, it’s time to learn what treatment steps you need.




leave your comment

Top